Victorian Landcare Magazine - Summer 2018, Issue 71

Fly fishers help revegetate Little River

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Waterways Revegetation and biolinks

p20 fishers hero

Above: Victorian Fly-Fishers’ Association Council Members Alex Evans (left) and Jason Platts braved wet and cold conditions to assist with revegetation works along the Little River.

By Dermot O’Brien

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Dermot O’Brien
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The Victorian Fly-Fishers’ Association (VFFA) is well aware that the future of trout fishing in Victoria is dependent on one critical factor – habitat.

The Victorian Fly-Fishers’ Association (VFFA) is well aware that the future of trout fishing in Victoria is dependent on one critical factor – habitat.

With that in mind, 20 VFFA members headed over the Black Spur to Taggerty on a cold and wet Sunday in August 2017 to participate in a riparian revegetation program.

We were met at the Taggerty General Store by Sue Kosch from the Goulburn Broken CMA. Sue explained the plan to plant hundreds of seedlings along the banks of Little River as part of a two-year revegetation program and gave us a demonstration of the best planting technique.

Two years ago this stretch of Little River was choked with weeds including blackberry and Japanese honeysuckle. These weeds were so invasive they had a stranglehold on trees along the river and the CMA had to call in heavy machinery to help clear the banks.

According to Sue, Japanese honeysuckle can live for 70 to 100 years. It chokes trees and shrubs and prevents native plants from establishing.

"The planting was an opportunity for fishers to put something back into the environment. There were also some good discussions with locals who share our concerns about healthy streams, improved riparian zones and increased fencing off which can reduce fishing access."

Sue Kosch from the Goulburn Broken CMA demonstrates planting techniques to members of the Victorian Fly-Fishers’ Association at Taggerty.

Above: Sue Kosch from the Goulburn Broken CMA demonstrates planting techniques to members of the Victorian Fly-Fishers’ Association at Taggerty.

The CMA and the Taggerty Community Progress Group have been working in partnership to remove the invaders, restore access and improve the general habitat of the Little River riparian zone. 

Kitted out in oil-skins and rubber boots, we were lucky the rain held off as we got stuck in and planted the 400 seedlings that had been laid out along the river. The indigenous native species included manna gum, blackwood, prickly currant bush, hazel pomaderris and various tea-tree species and sedges.

Sue Kosch explained the importance of getting the job done so the seedlings had the best chance to establish their roots in spring in preparation for a hot and dry summer.

The local volunteers were very appreciative. They said it would have taken them a couple of weekends to complete the planting.

This was an important project for the VFFA as members have a long association with the area. The Rubicon, Acheron, Steavenson and Taggerty rivers or streams and the Goulburn River have had their waters stalked by our members over many decades.

The planting was an opportunity for fishers to put something back into the environment. There were also some good discussions with locals who share our concerns about healthy streams, improved riparian zones and increased fencing off which can reduce fishing access.

The VFFA hopes to be involved in similar projects in the future.

For further information contact Dermot O’Brien from the VFFA by email at dermotobrien30@gmail.com

Location of Taggerty, in the Goulburn Broken region.

Above: Location of Taggerty, in the Goulburn Broken region.

Explore other articles about

Waterways Revegetation and biolinks


By Dermot O’Brien

Name:

For more information about the subject of this story

Name:
Dermot O’Brien
Email: